Welcome

My name is Fabrizio Montesi.

I'm a Professor of Computer Science, Villum Young Investigator, and IT professional interested in programming languages, concurrency, logic, microservices, web development, and cybersecurity.

Check out the menu on the top-right if you are looking for material about my research, projects, education, tools, or my blog.

I really enjoy working with people. (You can see some of my past and current PhD students and postdocs.)

If you're interested in chatting about topics I'm interested in, working with me, or you're just curious about something I do, you are very welcome to contact me on any of the following.

Open Positions

  • Call coming soon (May 2020): 1 postdoc and 1 PhD student position to work on types, choreographies, and distributed computing (project: Choreographies for Connected IT Systems).
  • Call coming soon (May 2020): 1 PhD student position to work on parametric APIs for microservices.

Short Bio

(Every now and then I am asked for a short bio, so here it is.)

Fabrizio Montesi is Professor (Full Professor) of Computer Science at the University of Southern Denmark, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, where he currently serves as Head of Section for the section of Concurrency and Logic. Fabrizio also serves as President of the Microservices Community, and as maintainer of Jolie, an open source programming language for microservices. Previously, he was Co-CEO of italianaSoftware, where he now serves as a Founding Director.

He received his M.Sc. Degree in Computer Science from the University of Bologna in 2010, and his Ph.D. Degree in Computer Science from the IT University of Copenhagen in 2013.

Fabrizio is a Villum Young Investigator (2020) and recipient of the SDU Innovation Prize (2017), the EAPLS (European Association for Programming Languages and systems) Best PhD Dissertation Award (2014), and an award for Best M.Sc. thesis on ICT by the General Confederation of Italian Industry (2011).

Fabrizio's main interest is the science of programming. His research focuses on theory and implementation of programming languages, concurrency, microservices, process calculi, logic, and cybersecurity.